National Park Service Highlights NR Nomination by Fly/Hunt

Entrance Court Gate #3 at Buffalo Zoo, John E. Brent, Landscape Architect & Architect
Entrance Court Gate #3 at Buffalo Zoo, John E. Brent, Landscape Architect & Architect

The National Park Service (NPS) website features the National Register (NR) listing of the Entrance Court at the Buffalo Zoo, Buffalo New York.  The Entrance Court was designed by pioneer African American architect and Landscape Architect John Edmonston Brent (1889 – 1962).  Ellen P. Hunt/AIA collaborated with me to research, interpret and produce the successful NR nomination. The key to the project methodology was being aware of “context” in every aspect.  Before we began the project we were aware of the deep significance and national legacies of Frederick Law Olmsted; twenty three Colored Y.M.C.A.’s built across America; Dr. Booker T. Washington; Tuskegee Institute; and Mr. Julius Rosenwald.  Once we were introduced to Mr. Brent’s association with the Buffalo Colored Y.M.C.A. we were immediately able to identify leads to other aspects of his work and civic life.

 

Historic Black Towns Alliance-6: Historic Resources Archival Preservation

1915 Tuskegee Institute class photo and municipal documents -<br />photo courtesy Chaitra Powell
1915 Tuskegee Institute class photo and municipal documents -
photo courtesy Chaitra Powell

Three of the University of North Carolina’s (UNC) top archivists have visited historic Black towns to conduct preliminary field assessments of historic records, documents, photographs, art works, artifacts and oral history sources. The archivists met with residents and government officials. Dr. Bryan Giemza,Ph.D., Director of the University of North Carolina Southern Historical Collection, visited Eatonville, Florida and Mound Bayou, Mississippi. Biff Hollingsworth, Collecting and Outreach Archivist, visited Grambling, Louisiana and Mound Bayou, Mississippi. Chaitra Powell, African American Collections and Outreach Archivist, visited Tuskegee, Alabama and Hobson City, Alabama.  A sample of historic materials from each community….MORE

 

South Texas & San Antonio: Black History, Culture & Place™_2

Menger Soap Works (1850) sheltered Black church services in San Antonio, Texas
Menger Soap Works (1850) sheltered Black church services in San Antonio, Texas

There are so many layers of history and culture in the south Texas and San Antonio region that it is literally very difficult to take a step without encountering a significant landmark or story. For many years a myth has been generated that there is “…no significant Black history in south Texas and San Antonio.” Documentation ranging from periodicals, church histories, photographs, maps and public records makes it clear that the myth is absolutely not true.

The Menger Soap Works structure was built in 1850, on the west bank of San Pedro Creek, less than one half mile west of the San Antonio River. The structure is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as an example of pre-Civil War industrial architecture, and currently serves as the leasing office for a modern apartment complex. However, between 1868 and 1873 it was rented to “Colored Methodist” and African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) church congregations for fifteen dollars a month for religious services. The congregations were started by former Black slaves.  In the coming decades, the congregations evolved to serve Black enclaves within one mile of historic Main Plaza, on the west side of the city. Successors of these original Black congregations still survive in west San Antonio, approaching their one hundred and fiftieth anniversaries.

South Texas & San Antonio: Black History, Culture & Place™_1

Simon Turner, San Jose News (CA), Lomar Service photo, 9-06-1928
Simon Turner, San Jose News (CA), Lomar Service photo, 9-06-1928

Black businessmen began to work on San Antonio’s Alamo Plaza soon after the end of the Civil War in 1865.  Mr. Simon Turner (Black; 1855 – 1942) enlisted at the rank of private in the United States Cavalry in 1867.  He was assigned to the Buffalo Soldiers regiment of the U.S. Cavalry stationed in Oklahoma until 1881.  In 1881 he was reassigned with other Buffalo Soldiers to deliver mail from El Paso, Texas.  Mr. Turner was wounded in action in 1882, and was discharged at the rank of sergeant in 1883, before moving to San Antonio.  Initially, he found work as a porter at the Maverick Bank, on the northwest corner of Alamo Plaza,  at the intersection of Alamo and East Houston.  From 1886 through 1892 Mr. Turner served in the 1st Colored Regiment, Infantry as the Captain of Company A, Excelsior Guard militia (San Antonio).

1891 advertisement, Johnson & Chapman’s General Directory of the City of San Antonio
1891 advertisement, Johnson & Chapman’s General Directory of the City of San Antonio

Between 1884 and 1890 Mr. Turner served as a delegate to a series of “Colored Men’s State Conventions” that addressed civil rights and social issues for Black Texans during the Reconstruction period. By 1891 Mr. Turner was able to operate his own fruit store and “ice cream saloon” near the southwest corner of what is now Alamo and East Crockett Street.  By 1900 he moved to San Jose, California.  In 1928 he received a medal of honor forty five years after his honorable discharge.

Historic Black Towns Alliance – 5: National Trust Innovation

C. E. Hanna (Calhoun County Training, erected c.1943) School, Hobson City Alabama
C. E. Hanna (Calhoun County Training, erected c.1943) School, Hobson City Alabama

This afternoon the National Trust for Historic Preservation (NTHP) announced that the Historic Black Towns and Settlements Alliance (HBTSA) has received a one-time national Innovation Grant in the field of historic preservation. A large number of applications were submitted from organizations in Alabama, the District of Columbia, Kansas, Louisiana, eastern Massachusetts (broadly defined as the Boston metropolitan area), Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, and Washington. The HBTSA proposal was researched and prepared by Everett L. Fly, Ellen P. Hunt, Dr. Carey Latimore, and N.Y. Nathiri.

The HBTSA is composed of five of America’s most historic Black towns:
Tuskegee, Macon County, Alabama (settled c.1833; incorporated 1843)
Grambling, Lincoln Parish, Louisiana (settled c.1865; incorporated 1953)
Hobson City, Calhoun County, Alabama (settled c.1865; incorporated 1899)
Eatonville, Orange County, Florida (settled c.1881; incorporated 1887)
Mound Bayou, Bolivar County, Mississippi (settled c.1887; incorporated 1898)

The Innovation Grant will support planning and programmatic costs up to $10,000.

The project meets National Trust interests in the following preservation priorities:
• Building sustainable communities: Demonstrating that historic preservation supports economic, environmental and cultural sustainability in communities.
• Reimagining historic sites: Application of innovative, replicable strategies that create new models for historic site interpretation and stewardship.
• Promoting diversity and place: Broaden the cultural diversity of historic preservation by exposing the depth and scope of American history embodied in historic Black towns and settlements as a collective national resource.

Historic Black Towns Alliance- 4: 115 Years – Hobson City, Alabama

First Hobson City mayor and council c.1901 – photograph courtesy of The New York Public Library: www.nypl.org
First Hobson City mayor and council c.1901 – photograph courtesy of The New York Public Library: www.nypl.org

Mayor Alberta McCrory and the residents of Hobson City, Calhoun County, Alabama will celebrate their 115th Founder’s Day on August 15th and 16th of this week (details at Hobson City Hall: 256-831-4940).   In addition to being the oldest incorporated Black municipality in the state (chartered 1899), it is one of fewer than twenty five incorporated African American towns remaining in the United States.  The town charter was signed by forty nine registered male voters, according to the requirements of the Alabama state constitution at the time.  The adjacent photograph shows Hobson City’s first elected officials, and the 1900 Federal Census provided occupation information: Young Pyles (standing, left; occupation – farm laborer), Peter Doyle (seated, left; occupation-farm laborer), Jesse Cunningham (standing, center; occupation – farmer), Edward Pearce (standing, right; occupation – carpenter), C.C. Snow (seated, right; occupation – laborer), and Mayor Samuel L. Davis (seated, center; occupation – Mayor of Hobson City)….MORE

 

 

 

Historic Black Towns Alliance – 3: Landscape Design

1910 Tuskegee gardening students outside greenhouse – photo courtesy Tuskegee Archives
1910 Tuskegee gardening students outside greenhouse – photo courtesy Tuskegee Archives

Black landscape designers and gardeners have been present in America since the colonial days of this nation.  Wormley Hughes, African American slave, was trained as a “gardener” on Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, Virginia plantation for more than thirty years, beginning in 1794.  James F. Brown, escaped Negro slave, was the head “gardener” for the prominent, and classically styled, Mount Gulian estate in Dutchess County, New York from 1829 to 1864.  It is well documented that Mr. Brown often corresponded with the renowned White 19th century landscape designer and gardener, Andrew Jackson Downing.  Once Black Americans were able to own land, gardens became conscious, and integral, components of Black towns and settlements in all regions of the United States. The Tuskegee Institute 1899-1900 catalog listed courses in the Agriculture Division for men and women.  Separate courses were listed for “Horticulture” and “Market Gardening”, while “Floriculture and Landscape Gardening” were combined into a single course.  All were offered in a progressive sequence over two years of study.  The women’s second year, fall term, “Floriculture and Landscape Gardening” course description reads as follows:

Systematic botany, bouquet making, harmony of color, form and size of

flowers, laying out of private and public grounds, road, parks, walks, and

streets; entomology of the flower garden.

These and four other courses provided classroom and field training that addressed topics ranging from proper use of tools to sustainable practices and techniques.

Historic Black Towns Alliance – 2: Architecture , Land, & Cultural Landscape

1912 advertisement courtesy Tuskegee University Archives
1912 advertisement courtesy Tuskegee University Archives

Across the United States the presence of historic architecture is being used too often as the singular measure of the importance of a settlement or town.  Some argue that a limited number, or absence, of styled buildings in a settlement or town indicates that there is not much important value or substance in the civic and cultural life of the community. Some use the current locations of architecture, buildings that follow academic design styles, to define the most important area to preserve in a community.   Without a doubt, architecture is an important source and expression of American culture, but it is not the only authentic asset or legitimate historical reference.

The advertisement for Mound Bayou, Mississippi in the adjacent frame appeared in the 1912 edition of the Negro Yearbook published by Tuskegee Institute in Macon County, Alabama.  It is telling to note the number of land related words, such as real estate, town, and acres, that appear in the copy.  The words town and community are also emphasized.  It is clear that the land and community were Mound Bayou’s most important resources. …MORE

Historic Black Towns & Settlements Alliance-1

Mayor Johnny Ford/Tuskegee, AL
Mayor Johnny Ford/Tuskegee, AL
Mayor Alberta McCrory/Hobson City, AL
Mayor Alberta McCrory/Hobson City, AL
Mayor Bruce Mount/Eatonville, FL
Mayor Bruce Mount/Eatonville, FL
Mayor Darryl Johnson/Mound Bayou, MS
Mayor Darryl Johnson/Mound Bayou, MS
Mayor Ed Jones/Grambling, LA
Mayor Ed Jones/Grambling, LA

Mayors of five of America’s most historic Black towns have formed an alliance to protect and preserve for future generations the heritage, history and cultural traditions of Alliance members such that those who follow will have the ability to assume active stewardship to understand, interpret and appreciate these historic places through the lenses of their inhabitants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuskegee, Macon County, Alabama – settled c.1833; incorporated 1843 - 181 years

Grambling, Lincoln Parish, Louisiana – settled c.1865; incorporated 1953 – 149 years

Hobson City, Calhoun County, Alabama – settled c.1865; incorporated 1899 – 149 yrs

Eatonville, Orange County, Florida – settled 1881; incorporated 1887 - 125 yrs

Mound Bayou, Bolivar County, Mississippi – settled c.1887; incorporated 1898 – 116 years

The mayors have engaged Everett L. Fly to provide a comprehensive scope of planning and historic preservation expertise as their principal consultant and advocate for the precedent setting project….. MORE

Texas Independence & African American Legacy – 1

Grave marker of Samuel McCulloch, Jr., Bexar County, Texas
Grave marker of Samuel McCulloch, Jr., Bexar County, Texas

March 2, 1836 is the date recognized as the Texas declaration of independence from Mexico. Many are not aware that Samuel McCulloch, Jr. (1810-1893), a free Black man, was seriously wounded on October 9, 1835 fighting for Texas independence in Goliad, Goliad County,Texas. Many historians acknowledge him as the first casualty of the Texas Revolution for independence from Mexico.

Mr. McCulloch survived his wounds.  As a veteran of the war he was entitled to a land grant for service.  However, the Republic of Texas constitution, adopted in 1836, prohibited “Africans (and) the descendants of Africans or Indians” from citizenship – civil rights.  McCulloch had the courage to petition the Republic of Texas Congress for his right to own property.  The McCulloch petition was signed into law in 1837 by the President of the Republic of Texas, Sam Houston (1793-1863).  McCulloch was not the first, or only, Black person to chip away at the discriminatory laws prior to, or after, Texas statehood (1845).

McCulloch used the land to farm and raise cattle in south Bexar County, near San Antonio.  He donated land for a church, Medina Baptist.  The congregation evolved to be composed of Tejanos, Blacks and Whites.  He also dedicated land for a school since Texas state laws prohibited the use of public funds for Black school land or buildings.  Sam McCulloch, and other Black Texans, were active, not passive participants in the process of claiming and exercising civil rights for all residents of the state.  The grave of Samuel McCulloch, Jr., some of his relatives, and  a number of his neighbors is extant in south Bexar County, Texas.

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